Element 1: Curiosity

Participatory cultures are built by each individual asking Questions of Self: 

  • What do I want? (in my life, family, company, community, city)
  • What can I give?

As each person awakens to their power to contribute, they then ask Questions of Others:

  • What do you want to see improved? 
  • What are your ideas on how that can happen?
  • What is stopping progress from being made?
  • How do you think you can help?  

 

ELEMENT 2: inclusion

"Nothing about us without us."

If you're creating solutions to benefit a group or individual, you must include them in the solution-making process. Involve your stakeholders from the beginning.

ELEMENT 3: ACCESS TO PHYSICAL SPACE

Physical space is necessary for social collisions, ideation, and relationship building. These places can be designed to be free, low-cost, accessible to diverse people, and architected for sparking relationships.

ELEMENT 4: ACCESS TO INFORMATION

This is the era of connection, networked by the Internet. Access to information is a must, and accelerates innovative problem solving, idea generation and empowers citizens who want to get involved. 

If you want to scale solutions, it requires information exchange via communications resources provided to your stakeholders.  Replication of civic engagement requires empowering participants with the storytelling tools necessary to inspire their neighbors, friends and others to action. 

Part Three comprises three empowering behaviors to drive engagement: 

ELEMENT 5: INVITING

Inviting is the simple act of inviting someone to participate. An invitation is an opening -- it's opening a door and saying, "Hey, would you like to help us make this? Would you like to lend a hand and get involved?" 

ELEMENT 6: CONNECTING

Connecting means building “the human network” by introducing people to each other when you foresee they will mutually benefit from the introduction. Connectors facilitate introductions without the need to gain from them.

ELEMENT 7: TRANSLATING

Translating means facilitating communications across differences (cultures, age, language, opinions, politics, etc.), which is often necessary. The behavior of translating facilitates mutual understanding. 

 

 

 

Special thanks to Lionel Mitelpunkt for his research support.